Myth and reality about cats.




There are several absurdities you regularly hear on cats. Several of these affirmations are demystified here.


MYTH:
The cat has his equilibrium center in these whiskers (vibrisse).
REALITY:
Cats use their whiskers as a sensor but not to maintain their equilibrium.






MYTH:
Cats always fall on their paws.
REALITY:
Cats do fall instinctively paws first and can survive falls from fairly elevated places. but, they can also fall flat on the ground and can break bones in this process. There exists several types of wire mesh or netting that can be installed to protect the cat from these falls from balconies or windows.



MYTH:
Cats must drink some milk every day.
REALITY:
Most cats like milk, but don't need it if they are properly fed. Several of them will get the diarrhea if they drink too much milk. If you do give some milk, it should be in small quantities and not very often.







MYTH:
Cats who are sterilized are automatically going to become overweight.
REALITY:
As people, cats gain weight when they eat too much, don't have enough exercise or both. In many cases, the sterilization is done at an age when the metabolism of the animal is already in slow motion and his needs for food will be decreasing. If the cat continues to eat the same quantity of food, he is going to evidently put on weight. The owner of the cat can avoid this by making sure his cat get the exercise need, and of course is not overfeeding him.



MYTH:
Cats can not get Rabies.
REALITY:
Currently, all hot blooded animals can get rabies, including cats, bats, skunks andferrets. Like dogs, cats must be vaccinated regularly according to local regulations and your veterinarian.




MYTH:
Cats who live inside are not able to catch illnesses.
REALITY:
Cats are constantly exposed to pathogens organisms that can be transported by air or by his master's clothes or shoes. Evidently, cats who go outside are more exposed to illnesses and parasites, they can be in contact with other infected animals or their excrements.


MYTH:
Putting garlic in animal's food will evacuate the worms.
REALITY:
The garlic can give taste to the animal's food, but has no effect on worms. The best way to treat worms is by giving the medication prescribed by your veterinarian.



MYTH:
Cats catch flat worms (tapeworms) when ingesting bad food.
REALITY:
Animals become infected with these worms by fleas that carry the larva of the parasite. They can catch parasites in eating contaminated rodents or by contact with contaminated animals .



MYTH:
Pregnant women should not acquire a cat.
REALITY:
Some cats can be infected by an illness called toxoplasmose, that can occasionally be transmitted to humans when they clean the litter box. This illness can cause serious problems to the fetus. However, this problem can be controlled if the future mother avoids all contact with the litter box and assigns her boyfriend or any other member of the family to the daily cleaning.




MYTH:
Animals take care of themselves by licking their wounds.
REALITY:
In fact the licking can slow down the healing and worsen the wound.






MYTH:
Cats must pass some time outside.
REALITY:
Cats are very happy and healthy in the house.






MYTH:
A cat's diet must be exclusively meat.
REALITY:
In fact, the cat is fundamentally a carnivore, his diet must be very well balanced. A diet based solely on meat can become very toxic.




MYTH:
Cats have nine lifes.
REALITY:
Two possible explanations to this myth: in antiquity cats were considered as good luck charms. In ancient Egypt, killing a cat was considered a serious crime. The fact that cats are able to recover quickly after an accident or a serious illness would be the best explanation.



MYTH:
A cat who spends his life inside will never have any fleas.
REALITY:
True and false at the same time. Effectively he will never catch any fleas unless your house is already infected or still another vector brings them inside. Thus, another animal such as a dog or you on your clothes can act as "transport" for fleas.




MYTH:
You can not keep two cats of the same sex together.
REALITY:
It is false, when they are sterilized, the interaction between the partners become most moderate. In fact, unless you are a breeder or you want to endure the disadvantages related to cats not sterilized, you will have no problems keeping two cats of the same sex together. Moreover, with non sterilized cats you have all the problems associated to the reproduction cycle and instinct.


MYTH:
Cats wag there tail when they are happy.
REALITY:
Cats don't "speak" the same language as dogs. In fact a cat wags his tail to show his intolerance or his discomfort facing a situation, an intruder or when he is hunting or interested in a prey. When this sign appears try to determine what is the reason and try to eliminate it before the situation degenerates into a conflict.


MYTH:
Whiskers are just longer hairs on the face.
REALITY:
In fact they are much more important than that. They are sensory organs that cats use, especially in the dark to determine the distance of a thing or a prey at the time of the hunt. They are important complements to the cat.s other senses.


MYTH:
Catnip makes cats crazy.
REALITY:
In fact, catnip is a plant from the mint family. A chemical substance in it acts as a drug on the cat's nervous system for a short time, making him happier. However, this effect is short, not cumulative and beneficial.



MYTH:
Ther's no special reason why the cat's pupil is vertical.

REALITY:
Evolution gave cats this kind of pupil to compensate for the excessive entrance of light in the eyes. The cat has an elevated visual capacity in the dark, its eyes are therefore very sensitive to light. The eye must have a good control on the quantity of light that it lets enter during the day to avoid damage to the retina . The combination of a vertical pupil and horizontal lid gives them a certain advantage and therefore is very important for the cat's vision.


MYTH:
A cat rubs against you to show his affection.
REALITY:
It is a little more complicated than that. In fact the cat rubs against you to impregnate his scent. Glands located at the level of his temples, his gums and at the base of the tail, produce smelling substances. What he is actually doing, is marking you as part of his territory.


MYTH:
Cats can instinctively recognize and avoid poisonous plants.
REALITY:
This is completely false, we have several poisonous plants in our houses that we should keep away from cats. These plants if they are ingested could poison or make the cat very sick.


MYTH:
Cats living inside don't need to be vaccinated.
REALITY:
It is false, all cats must be vaccinated regularly, at least once a year. A preventive vaccination will avoid in many cases the infection of your animal by various serious illnesses. A lot of the pathogens that cause these illnesses can travel in the air.






GeoCities
1